Open House for Butterflies

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Open House for Butterflies is one of the loveliest works to come out of the magical eight-year collaboration between the beloved children’s authors Ruth Krauss (1901-1903) and Maurice Sendak (1928-2012). With illustrations by Sendak, and words by Krauss, Open House for Butterflies is sweet, funny, and oftentimes soul-stirring in its purity and simplicity. A gem.

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Hello hello!

A monthly post has become the norm. It makes me miss the days when I had time to post more thoughtfully and regularly. Every time I receive an email from a friend via this blog sharing a good bit from the internet, a note of encouragement, or simply to say hello, I feel incredibly encouraged and touched. Thank you all!

I’ve been working full-time for the past few months, and am beginning to feel the separation pangs from not being able to devote as much time on Earlyware and other personal projects. I did, however, manage to update the shop with some prints I developed recently.

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I hope you guys like them!

One more thing before signing off – an incredible ad for The Sunday Times created by London ad agency Grey, London, re-enacting art, film, and music icons in one seamless clip. Scary good.

 

Nobutaka Aozaki

New York-based artist Nobutaka Aozaki‘s works make me smile. The first time I heard of Aozaki was from his project, From Here to There, in which Aozaki, pretending to be a tourist in New York, asks pedestrians for directions by having them draw a map to the destination.NobutakaAozaki_WorkNobutaka_Aozaki_map_detail01 From Here to There is an ongoing project, still yet unfinished, as Aozaki composes the small handrawn maps together to form a large map of Manhattan. Nobutaka_Aozaki_map02Value_Added is another one of his projects which I found amusing. The artist takes the same can of corn to multiple supermarket and re-buys it. The single can of corn has been re-bought from 105 supermarkets for a total of $113.07. ( as of June 1, 2013 )
Nobutaka_Aozaki_can_01And another – Open Bag, in which Aozaki walks around the city with a backpack unzipped. Inside the backpack is a voice recorder, capturing the voices of strangers telling him his bag is open. A recording of these fleeting interactions is placed and played back in the open backpack .

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Check out more of Nobutaka Aozaki’s works here.

Lately

whaleThese Whale Bookends made me smile.

lunchMost of have seen the iconic “Lunch atop a Skyscraper” photo taken in 1932, but here’s a photo of some of the men napping after lunch-

lunch2Nuts!
sleepSpeaking of sleep, have you seen photos of Ted Spagna’s sleep portraiture work? : “Taken at fixed intervals throughout the night from a bird’s-eye view, and displayed in chronological order, the series of images reads like a silent film.”

nyny2Really excited for Brandon and his upcoming book, based on his beautiful project, Humans of New York. It’ll be out in mid-October, but you can pre-order the book here.

Good read: Gardens, not buildings. 

ice ice2 ice3Iceland.

Six micro-movies on the physics of love: What Love Looks Like.

Pomegranate

DSC_0004Treasure seekers of the world…

Have you looked inside a pomegranate? Squeeze one softly and listen- you may be able to hear the jewels inside glittering in the dark. When you open one up, you’ll discover a cave, encrusted with a million rubies! They’ll sparkle as light cuts through the clear kernels of red glass for the very first time.

These are pretty rubies you can eat! Pluck one off, and in your mouth it will pop with sweet and tart juices for only a moment- then disappear. 

New York

metIf you happen to be in New York, and if you happen to like deer beds and rain, I’d visit this two exhibitions. I qualify only on the latter stance, so I can only wish…DeerBedKatherine Wolkhoff’s exhibition, Deer Beds, is at the Sasha Wolf Gallery in the Lower East Side. The show consist of seven photographs of imprints made in the grass by sleeping deer. Those images of deer beds make me think of peaceful slumber, the warmth of the body of a living animal, and the feeling of lying very close to the earth.

rain-room-moma-ps1008Rain Room is an interactive exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art. A heavy downpour of water  falls like rain in an expansive dark and mysterious space, and visitors can walk through the storm without getting wet. Motion sensors pause the rain wherever body movement is detected, so you can walk, dance, and contemplate deep thoughts as millions of raindrops shower down around you from all sides. moma-rain-room Pretty neat.

Keep Going

It’s been one of those months where a million things seems to be happening at once and everything’s a blur, and the weather is perfect, which makes this business all the more excruciating, because all you really want to do is lie down on the grass with a good book, a mason jar of tart lemonade, and your lover’s belly as your pillow, getting to know Spring in the most intimate way, while the birds chirp in the air, and the sky goes on being blue, and the fluffy clouds s  l  o  w  l  y drift over you as your eyelids softly close to a midday slumber.

Whew.

But work. Work is good too.

Have you watched this?

Ira Glass on the Secret of Success in Creative Work. Ira is so great.

 

(Image source: 1. flickr / salutemyshorts; 2. Jason St. Peter)